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November 2016

Kristen Schorpp, “Socioeconomic Conditions and Health across the Lifespan: Trends and Underlying Mechanisms”

November 16, 2016 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Kristen Schorpp, "Socioeconomic Conditions and Health across the Lifespan: Trends and Underlying Mechanisms"

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January 2017

Colloquium Series: Aliya Saperstein, Stanford University

January 25 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Racial Mobility: The Dynamics of Race and Inequality in the U.S. Professor Saperstein will make the case for a more dynamic understanding of the relationship between race and inequality by introducing a "racial mobility" perspective that brings together constructivist theories of race and the tools of sociological studies of social mobility. In particular, she argues that a person’s race should be conceptualized more like their occupational or marital status than their date of birth. Evidence for this perspective comes from…

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February 2017

Courtney Boen, Lisa Pearce, and Karolyn Tyson; “Making Your Writing More Effective, Efficient, and Enjoyable”

February 15 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Courtney Boen, Lisa Pearce, and Karolyn Tyson; "Making Your Writing More Effective, Efficient, and Enjoyable"

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Colloquium Series: Frederick Wherry, Yale University

February 22 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Fred Wherry

To Lend or Not to Lend: Obfuscating Denials and Managing Negative Social Capital Sociologists have recognized that help seeking behaviors can impose excessive claims on some network members. Drawing on interviews with individuals in an innovative credit building program, this article presents previously unseen strategies that benefactors enact to negotiate with help seekers about how much assistance (if any) they can provide. While it is difficult to say no to close family members and desperate friends, lenders can obfuscate a…

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March 2017

Colloquium Series: Stefanie DeLuca, Johns Hopkins University

March 1 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Coming of Age in the Other America Recent research on inequality and poverty has shown that those born into low-income families, especially African Americans, still have difficulty entering the middle class, in part because of the disadvantages they experience living in more dangerous neighborhoods, going to inferior public schools, and persistent racial inequality. Despite overwhelming odds, some disadvantaged urban youth do achieve upward mobility. Drawing from ten years of fieldwork with parents and children who resided in Baltimore public housing,…

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Colloquium Series: Deb Umberson, Univerity of Texas Austin

March 22 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

A Legacy of Loss: Race Differences in Timing and Exposure to Death of Family Members in the U.S. Longstanding racial differences in U.S. life expectancy suggest that Black Americans would be exposed to significantly more family member deaths than White Americans from childhood through adulthood, which, given the health risks posed by grief and bereavement, would add to the disadvantages that they face. Umberson will present new results from an analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth…

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Karen Gerken and Youn Lee, “Navigating the Non-Academic Job Market”

March 29 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Karen Gerken and Youn Lee, "Navigating the Non-Academic Job Market"

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April 2017

Colloquium Series: Korie Edwards, Ohio State University

April 3 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Stressors and Strains of Diversity: A Case of Multichurch Racial Pastors

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Jonathan Horowitz, Phil Morgan, Kate Weisshaar; “Making the Most of Conferences”

April 12 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Jonathan Horowitz, Phil Morgan, Kate Weisshaar; "Making the Most of Conferences"

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Colloquium Series: Natalie B. Aviles, Colby College

April 19 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Innovation in a “culture of planning”: HPV vaccines and translational research in the National Cancer Institute   This talk explores the role scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a US federal science agency, played in researching and testing vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV). Dr. Aviles argues that interpretations of “translational research” native to the NCI influenced these researchers’ efforts to design and test first- and second-generation HPV vaccines. Beginning in the 1990s, these understandings informed and were in turn…

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